Friday, July 19, 2013

2013 Emmy Nominations



The Emmy Nominations are in and boy, are they a doozy. There's the usual list of snubs and surprises but the real bombshell comes in the form of House of Cards, the Netflix-original series about shady political machination, that scored nominations for Drama Series (the TV equivalent of the Best Picture Oscar) as well as lead actor and actress.

That's right, for the first time ever the best drama on television may end up being a drama that never actually aired on a television. A win – which I wager is unlikely – would be a peacock feather in the cap of Netflix, who bet big on its new original programming binge-viewing model, and would also help usher in the end of broadcast tv as we know it.

But no such love for Netflix' flagship comedy, the ultra buzzy Arrested Developed that ressurected this year after a decade-long hiatus. Ultimately it appears the show's unconventional storytelling format, which focused on a single character per episode and featured a meandering, meta-humor, non-chronological plot, proved too out-there for Emmy voters, meaning we continue to live in a world where Two and a Half Men is considered "outstanding." (ed note: The Horror!)

The Good:

• I love that House of Cards was nominated, as it represents a bold statement on modern television and gives credit where credit is due. HOC delivered a season of truly compelling drama, with superb performances from it's lead actors Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, who both picked up acting nods.

• Emmy voters made the right call by honoring 30 Rock's final season while snubbing the last outing of our friends at The Office. It's a testament to that fact that sentimentality is no substitute for quality.

• If I was going to pick a single actor to nominate from Arrested Development I'm not sure it would be Jason Bateman. Yes, he is the central character that held the various plotlines together, but his storyline during the most recent season ranks somewhere in the middle of the pack. Besides a few great gags about the faux-rivalry between Jerry Bruckheimer and Ron Howard, all of that "You're out of the movie" talk landed with a dull thud for me. It should be noted, though, that fellow AD cast mate Tony Hale (the indelible Buster) scored a nomination for his supporting role on HBO's Veep.

• Similar kudos to the Emmy for recognizing Girls' Adam Driver. Creator-writer-star Lena Dunham earned her well-deserved kudos last year, but in season 2 it was the men of Girls, not the girls of Girls, that stole the spotlight, none more so than the conflicted Adam, who bounces back and forth between hero and villain without ever sacrificing authenticity. It's Adam's storyline that stands out the most this year, particularly for that episode (you know which one).

The Bad:

• The aforementioned Two and a Half Men, which continues to enjoy success in the world despite being the intellectual equivalent of a bag of wet hair.

• I hate to call Downton Abbey's nominations "bad," but given the lackluster third season we just witnessed I can't hep but feel there's other shows/actors/actresses that deserve those slots on the ballot.

• Not to drone on about House of Cards but it's a crime that Corey Stoll wasn't nominated in the supporting actor category. His tragic Pete Russo was the breakout star of the show and the moral glue that held the whole enterprise together. Frankly, I'm a little concerned how season 2 will be without him, since he was just about the only decent human being the audience could root for.

• There's nothing more vindicating for a fan than to see your favorite, ratings-challenged show get nominated post-cancellation, which is why I'm somewhat crushed that my deerly-departed Happy Endings will end its tenure with absolutely no Emmy love. Ensemble shows always provide a challenge for the acting categories (see: the perennial Modern Family dilemma) but come on, couldn't we have left off Two and a Half Men off the Comedy Series category just this one for the sake of truth and justice? (ed note: Ben is now whimpering in a corner)

• Two words: Schmidt happens.

The Interesting:

Connie Britton is great, but Nashville? No nominations required. Also, Scandal? Really?

• Last year's Comedy supporting actor winner Eric Stonestreet is notably absent. But honestly, at this point that category is a just a revolving door of Modern Family men.

• I love that Elisabeth Moss is nominated in both the Drama and the Miniseries categories. Sadly, that probably means she'll win neither.
Here's the (mostly) full list of this year's nominations. Are you shocked? Surprised? Enraged? Let me know in the comments.

DRAMA SERIES:
Breaking Bad, AMC
Downton Abbey, PBS
Homeland, Showtime
Game of Thrones, HBO
House of Cards, Netflix
Mad Men, AMC

COMEDY SERIES:
The Big Bang Theory, CBS
Girls, HBO
Louie, FX
Modern Family, ABC
30 Rock, NBC
Veep, HBO

LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES:
Hugh Bonneville, Downton Abbey, PBS
Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad, AMC
Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom, HBO
Jon Hamm, Mad Men, AMC
Damian Lewis, Homeland, Showtime
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards, Netflix

LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES:
Connie Britton, Nashville, ABC
Claire Danes, Homeland, Showtime
Michele Dockery, Downton Abbey, PBS
Vera Farmiga, Bates Motel, A&E
Elisabeth Moss, Mad Men, AMC
Kerry Washington, Scandal, ABC
Robin Wright, House of Cards, Netflix

LEAD ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES:
Jason Bateman, Arrested Development, Netflix
Louis CK, Louie, FX
Don Cheadle, House of Lies, Showtime
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes, Showtime
Jim Parsons, Big Bang Theory, CBS
Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock, NBC

LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES:
Lena Dunham, Girls, HBO
Laura Dern, Enlightened, HBO
Tiny Fey, 30 Rock, NBC
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation, NBC
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep, HBO
Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie, Showtime

SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES:
Adam Driver, Girls, HBO
Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Modern Family, ABC
Ed O'Neill, Modern Family, ABC
Ty Burrell, Modern Family, ABC
Bill Hader, Saturday Night Live, NBC
Tony Hale, Veep, HBO

SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES:
Mayim Bialik, The Big Bang Theory, CBS
Jane Lynch, Glee, Fox
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family, ABC
Julie Bowen, Modern Family, ABC
Merritt Wever, Nurse Jackie, Showtime
Jane Krakowski, 30 Rock, NBC
Anna Chlumsky, Veep, HBO

SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES:
Bobby Cannavale, Boardwalk Empire, HBO
Jonathan Banks, Breaking Bad, AMC
Aaron Paul, Breaking Bad, AMC
Jim Carter, Downton Abbey, PBS
Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones, HBO
Mandy Patinkin, Homeland, Showtime

SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES:
Anna Gunn, Breaking Bad, AMC
Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey, AMC
Emilia Clarke, Game of Thrones, HBO
Christine Baranski, The Good Wife, CBS
Morena Baccarin, Homeland, Showtime
Christina Hendricks, Mad Men, AMC

MINISERIES OR MOVIE:
American Horror Story: Asylum, FX
Behind The Candelabra, HBO
The Bible, HISTORY
Phil Spector, HBO
Political Animals, USA
Top Of The Lake, Sundance Channel

LEAD ACTOR IN A MINISERIES OR MOVIE:
Michael Douglas, Behind The Candelabra, HBO
Matt Damon, Behind The Candelabra, HBO
Toby Jones, The Girl, HBO
Benedict Cumberbatch, Parade's End, HBO
Al Pacino, Phil Spector, HBO

LEAD ACTRESS IN A MINISERIES OR MOVIE:
Jessica Lange, American Horror Story, FX
Laura Linney, The Big C: Hereafter, Showtime
Helen Mirren, Phil Spector, HBO
Sigourney Weaver, Political Animals, USA
Elisabeth Moss, Top Of The Lake, Sundance Channel

No comments:

Post a Comment